AIDS and Religious Life in Malawi: Rethinking How Population Dynamics Shape Culture

UNAIDS’ latest report on the global HIV pandemic features a bold title: “How AIDS Changed Everything.” The 500-page report almost lives up to its promise; it covers almost everything from patent law, to gender dynamics, to orphan care. In a new paper published in Population, I add to this list of everythings. I demonstrate how, in the context of Malawi’s generalized epidemic, AIDS has altered religious messages about family life — divorce in particular — not within one particular religious group but across all five of the country’s major religious traditions.

Continue reading

Everything You Always Wanted To Know About Sex (Selection)

Population recently embarked on a new annual series of articles providing an overview of emerging demographic issues spanning the latest research on data, theories, and policy implications. Prenatal sex selection — now spreading from Asia to Eastern Europe — has been selected as the topic for the first installment.

Continue reading

Are Expatriates Really That Different From Immigrants?

Expatriates – highly-skilled workers who temporarily live abroad because of their jobs – are often seen as extraordinary people, not only very different from those who have always lived in their country of birth, but also much unlike immigrants, who moved to another country to stay there more or less permanently. In contrast to ‘ordinary’ migrants, expatriates are usually depicted as cosmopolitans, who feel at home anywhere, but are rooted nowhere. Some scholars argue that expatriates present themselves as world citizens, but that in reality, they only feel comfortable with transnational business men and women like themselves.

Continue reading